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Taking Care of Business: Hiring the Right Accounting Bookkeeping Service

Taking Care of Business: Hiring the Right Accounting Bookkeeping Service

In this fast-paced world, keeping track of your company’s finances is a 24/7 job. That important balance between paying attention to the business aspects and the people aspect can easily get lost in the mix. Hiring the right staff will bridge the gap and make it easier for you to run your business. Depending on your business, you may need just an entry-level position or several positions with varying skill levels. This article will discuss the types of accounting bookkeeping service and support staff that can be found in the accounting industry.

 

Types of Recordkeeping Staff

As a business owner it can be overwhelming to do all the daily tasks on your own—recording sales, collecting the money, setting up lines of credit for return customers, depositing all the daily receipts, and making sure each day is properly closed out. If you just need someone to do the bookkeeping, it could make sense to hire a bookkeeper to ensure nothing is missed.

 

General Accounting Bookkeeper

General bookkeepers deal with the daily postings and financial transactions of a business, preparing invoices, posting payments, and keeping up with monthly bank reconciliations. They will have a basic understanding of double-entry accounting and will be familiar with financial software like QuickBooks or Xero.

 

Full-charge Bookkeeper

Full-charge bookkeepers have many of the same responsibilities as general bookkeepers. In addition, they also prepare financial statements and often handle running payrolls. They have taken a few accounting classes, so will have a higher level of experience.

 

Certified Bookkeeper

 

Accounting BookkeeperThis type of accounting bookkeeper handles everything a general and full-charge bookkeeper do and a whole lot more. Certified bookkeepers have at least two years of experience working in the accounting bookkeeper service field and must pass a four-part exam. They handle running payrolls, quarterly tax payments, and closing out the books.

An  accounting bookkeeping service is an excellent choice for helping with your company’s basic operations by ensuring the accuracy of your data. It is impossible to make sound financial decisions without a solid foundation of accuracy.

 

Types of Accounting Bookkeeping Service and Analytical Staff

What if you want to grow your operations or closely track your costs to save money to expand your products or services. Hiring an accountant who can offer strategic financial advice would help you better understand the story behind the data.

 

Junior Accountant or Entry-Level Accountant

The duties of a junior accountant depend on the abilities of the candidate. Most entry-level positions require a bachelor’s degree in accounting, finance, or a related field. Junior accountants choose accounting as a career because they have a healthy interest in how businesses run. They are analytical, have an elevated level of attention to detail, and strong abilities in being organized.

Junior accountants support upper management and senior accountants while supplying important services within your company. Their duties include everything that a bookkeeper does. They also prepare financial statements, prepare budgets, and maintain the accounting records.

 

Staff Accountant or Financial Analyst

Although financial analysts and accountants are separate disciplines, they have some important commonalities. Both specialties require a bachelor’s degree and have had some experience working with upper management to address the unique needs of a business. Although accountants and financial analysts love numbers and analytics, they focus on different key areas of managing the business.

 

Staff Accountant

Accountants are interested in the financial accuracy, taxes, and day-to-day operations of a business. They look at the company’s past to ensure that the company’s present is in good standing. Many of the reports that accountants produce, including the raw data, are used by financial analysts to make forecasts on how to best use a company’s assets.

 

Financial Analyst

Financial analysts look at past and current trends to make forecasts for the future. Whereas accountants look at the details, financial analysts look at the overall picture. They work with accountants to make decisions about which projects will yield the highest rate of return for the company using macroeconomic or microeconomic approaches.

 

Senior Staff Accountants

Senior accountants are seasoned professionals who a have strong understanding of all the accounting cycles and how they relate to each other. Many have a master’s degree and may even be certified. They have advanced knowledge in finance, cost accounting, taxation, budgeting, and analytics.

Because of their experience and knowledge, senior accountants are poised to help you with tax planning, tax filing, responding to audit requests, and staying on top of compliance.

 

Conclusion

Whether you need a accounting bookkeeper service to run the day-to-day operations or an experienced accountant, choosing the right staff will pay dividends in the years to come. Regardless of who you hire, you want someone who is detail oriented, has effective communication skills, is highly organized, has excellent computer skills, and understands Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).

Tips To Avoid A Cash Crunch: 3 Ideas For Cash Flow Management

Tips To Avoid A Cash Crunch: 3 Ideas For Cash Flow Management

Cash flow is an important element of any small business. To effectively manage your cash flow, you need to be aware of all the aspects that can affect it and how they impact your business. The best way to achieve this is by understanding what might cause fluctuations in cash flow and coming up with solutions ahead of time for each negative event so as not to be caught off guard if one occurs. This article will discuss some common factors that may reduce or increase your company’s cash flow and provide tips on how to handle crunches when they arise.

What is Cash Flow?

In quite simple terms, cash flow is the money flowing in and out of your business each month. Small businesses need to strike a balance between accounts payable and accounts receivable to ensure that more money comes in than goes out each month. Although cash flow is related to net income, they have some key differences. 

Net income refers to the earnings of a business during a period after considering all expenses incurred during the period. Net income includes sales recognized but not collected until subsequent months. In addition, net income likely includes a monthly depreciation charge which is a non-cash item. These are important to consider when comparing net income to your operating cash flow.

Why is Cash Flow Important?

Understanding how your business generates and uses cash can help you better navigate the growth of your company. Analyzing your cash flow helps you see how well your business is performing and how much liquidity your business has. 

Having cash on hand puts you in a better financial position, adds stability, and gives you better purchasing power. Your cash flow determines how quickly you can expand your business. Additionally, having positive cash flow that leads to a surplus makes you a worthwhile investment for banks or investors. 

maximize cash flow

Tips for Boosting Your Business’ Cash Flow

There are so many things you can do to keep your business running smoothly.

You should have a plan for every day; when the unexpected happens, you should be able to react. There are three areas to focus on for boosting cash flow.

Increase Revenues

  • Keep an eye on customer retention rates, customers are the backbone of any business, and if you have a low customer retention rate, it is time to look at what is going on. Customers are the lifeblood of any company. They provide the revenue that funds your business, and they keep you in business. 
  • Find out what is lacking in the market and offer new products and categories to augment your current offerings. You may be able to charge a higher price for new or improving on existing items.

Decrease Expenses

  • Reach out to new suppliers or renegotiate prices with an existing vendor. Even offering to pay early could result in getting a small discount, which is almost always worth taking.
  • Find ways to automate, or even outsource, parts of your operations. 
  • Find less expensive suppliers that have nothing to do with the product you sell. You do not want to sacrifice product quality for a lower price since this affects your image and reputation in the market. Focus on costs such as office supplies or a less expensive insurance provider. 

Operational Efficiency

  • Be open about what your cash flow is like with your team. They will need to know what is going on if cash flow is already tight or if it becomes tight. They can help your business quickly find ways to cut expenses or reinvest profits into projects with high rates of return.
  • Find ways to increase your return on assets. Smart business owners track their return on assets because it reveals how effectively you are investing in your business.
  • Manage inventories through buying more efficiently or increasing inventory turnover. When you buy efficiently your customer is the focal point, which makes it easier to make more sales.

 

An interesting observation by the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto helps explain how best to manage cash flow. He noticed that 80 percent of the land in Italy was owned by 20 percent of the population. He further noticed that it happened in nature in that 80 percent of the peas in his garden were produced from 20 percent of the pods.

What does this have to do with cash flow management? Look at your business: it is likely that the Pareto Principle, also known as the 80/20 rule, is in play. Do 80 percent of your sales come from 20 percent of you customers? If so, it might make sense to cut out some of your more high-maintenance, low profitability clients. Your ratios may be different but understanding roughly 80 percent of an output results from almost 20 percent of an input gives you a competitive advantage on where to look to focus your effort and resources. 

By keeping an eye on your expenses, income, and operational efficiency you can predict when you might need a little extra cash coming in or going out. You can even use a budgeting tool to help with this process. You will see how much money is coming in each month and where all the money is going out each month, so it is easy for you to make changes if needed.

Accounting Software: Control Your Finances With Confidence and Ease

Accounting Software: Control Your Finances With Confidence and Ease

An accounting software system is a valuable tool for any business. It allows for more accurate record keeping, which in turn means less work and lower risk of mistakes. It enables you to automate labor-intensive accounting tasks and accelerates tax preparation. There are many benefits to using an accounting system, so it is important to explore them before making the decision on what type of software will best suit your needs. In this post we will review some popular features offered by accounting software systems and the costs associated with each one. We hope that after reading this you will have a better idea of how an accounting system can help you grow your business!

 

What is an accounting software system?

An accounting software system enables a company to keep track of all the various transactions that happen in a business. Transactions vary depending on the company and the industry, but most likely include sales, invoicing, accounts receivable, purchases, accounts payable, taxes, and payroll. All these transactions can be summarized, which provides valuable data for creating charts and predicting future performance.

There are three main types of accounting software systems. First, open-source accounting software is free and can be customized to the needs of the business. The downside is that open-source software may have hidden costs such as compatibility issues, support costs, training, and setup costs.

Second, canned accounting software (or desktop software) runs on your laptop or desktop. The data is also stored on the machine it is installed on. This is a great solution if you live in a rural community with a slow internet connection. It is also easy to use, costs less than other systems, and secure when you are not connected to the internet.

Last, cloud accounting software is stored online. With everyone being hacked these days you may wonder whether your data will truly be safe. The good news is you will not have to lie awake at night wondering if you many years of hard work will one day come crashing down. You are protected—many cloud-based solutions use bank-level encryption, so your finances are as secure as the money in your bank. In addition to security, no installation is required, no updates, backups are automatic, and you can access your data from multiple devices.

 

What are the benefits?

Using an accounting software system will save your company time and prevent avoidable human errors. Instead of tracking everything in a spreadsheet or a paper system, you have all your transactions in one place. It is easy to see what was spent or how much cash is coming into the business. You always know exactly where to find this information.

Accounting software automates some of the most boring accounting tasks, which dramatically increases the accuracy of your data. For example, you can set up so when a sale is made an invoice is sent to the customer set up on credit. The longer you wait, the harder it is to collect. By automating the process, you increase the likelihood of collecting. Furthermore, you can track your unpaid invoices and offer discounts for early payments.

Another benefit of an accounting system is the ability to track cash flow. Just like you can automate your accounts receivable, you can also automate other areas of accounting such as cash flow analysis. By connecting the accounting software to your bank accounts, you can easily reconcile your bank balance to your book balance in real time. No more waiting until the end of the month to find out where you stand financially.

One commonly overlooked area that is a huge win for businesses using accounting software is staying in compliance with taxes. Without good software, it can be difficult and keep track of taxes owed. A good software will calculate the sales tax and prepare the form for you.

If you opt for a cloud-based system (which I highly recommend), you have access to your accounting software system anytime you want. Literally, access to your business is at your fingertips. You can login anywhere you have a connection. So can your accountant, which makes it easy on everyone. Especially at tax time. Your accountant has everything he or she needs to file a complete and accurate return on your behalf.

 

Leveraging an Accounting System

New technologies continue to disrupt the role that accountants play in the marketplace. This is good news because accountants are well-positioned to provide the highest value to their clients. Because accountants are trained to see the big picture, they can further develop an accounting system to tailor to the needs of their clients. As a result, your accountant can be an invaluable source of analytics, insights, and best practices.

Gone are the days of the one-size-fits-all approach. Online accounting systems are compatible with hundreds of third-party applications that extend the usability of their platforms. Take QuickBooks Online, for example. There is a reason why QuickBooks has an 80 percent market share. Not only do they offer one of the most affordable accounting software packages, but they also have one of the most versatile accounting software systems. At the time this article was written, QuickBooks simple plan is $25, their Essentials plan is $40, their Plus plan is $70, and their Advanced plan is $150. All plans include QuickBooks mobile apps, support, and app integration.

What sets QuickBooks apart from their competitors is the software integrates well with third-party services, which make your financial management easier. As your business grows, you can add apps for spend management, billing and invoicing, eCommerce, time tracking, analytics, and inventory management. With over 650 apps to choose from, you are bound to find one that addresses any problems your business needs solved.

There are many advantages to using accounting software for your business. With QuickBooks Online you can use an online solution that is tailored specifically to you and your company’s needs. The benefits of a system like this will outweigh any potential risks associated with not having one in place. There are some great opportunities when choosing between different types of systems as well. We know how difficult it can be to choose which type of software works best for you, so please feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

 

 

How to understand your balance sheet: A beginner’s guide

How to understand your balance sheet: A beginner’s guide

A balance sheet is a financial statement that provides an overview of the company’s assets, liabilities, and equity at a specific point in time. It is important to know what each one means in order to understand how well you’re doing. It can be difficult to understand all the information on this document, but there are ways to break it down into more manageable pieces.

 

What is a balance sheet?

The balance sheet is a financial statement that provides information about the assets, liabilities, and equity of a company.

The first section of the balance sheet lists the assets on hand. Assets are anything that can be turned into cash. Assets include cash, accounts receivable (money owed to you), inventory (goods waiting to be sold), and prepaid expenses (e.g., insurance that is paid annually in advance). Assets are usually broken up into short-term (less than one year) and long-term (one year and longer)

The second part lists liabilities, which are things you owe money for. Liabilities include loans payable or due for goods purchased on credit. Like assets, liabilities are usually broken up into short-term and long-term.

Finally, equity is calculated by subtracting what you owe from what you own. This is also referred to as net worth or the net value of the business.

 

The importance of the balance sheet

Balance sheets are a snapshot of what a company’s assets, liabilities, and equity look like at any given point in time. A balance sheet is a tool that can be used to find out if a company has enough money to cover its obligations and stay afloat or enough assets to cover its long term obligations.

The balance sheet can also be used to determine how a company is financing its operations. A company that is generating enough net income will have higher retained earnings from one year to the next. A company that is financed through debt will have an increase in long-term liabilities year-over-year.

 

How to read a balance sheet

Below is an example of a balance sheet.

balance sheet

We already explained assets, liabilities, and stockholder’s equity. The balance sheet must always “balance” because assets equal liabilities plus equity (known as the accounting equation). Understanding this equation helps you understand a company’s position. If the company has more liabilities than assets, then it will have negative equity, which is a potential major red flag especially with mature businesses.

Investors and creditors like to determine a company’s financial health using something called ratio analysis. To determine how liquid a company is, divide current assets by current liabilities. In the example above, 67,500 / 34,200 = 1.92. Whether that is good or bad depends on the industry. In general, anything near or over 2.00 is acceptable.

Other performance indicators include solvency ratios (also called financial leverage ratios), profitability ratios, efficiency ratios, and coverage ratios. Corporations also have market prospect ratios which are used to predict performance, which is imperative when valuing a company’s stock price.

 

How to use information from the balance sheet to improve your finances

Did you know the information found on a balance sheet can also be used to measure your company’s vulnerability to risk? A complete balance sheet includes key pieces of information like cash on hand, accounts receivable and inventory. By analyzing these numbers, you will be able to see where your business is strong or weak in relation to other companies in similar industries. If there are any areas for improvement (i.e., too much debt), it will allow you time to prepare so that when the unexpected happens.

If you want to take control of your finances and improve them, the balance sheet is a good place to start. Understanding what it includes and how to read one will provide insight into where you can make changes in order to get more money for yourself or avoid unnecessary expenses that are taking too much from your paycheck.

The best way to use this information is by comparing two different months side-by-side on paper so that you have everything at hand. Once you have done this, focus on adjusting only those areas which seem most important – like lowering debt payments or reducing inventory on hand – and see if there is an impact in your bottom line!

The balance sheet is a powerful financial tool that can be used to improve your finances. It’s important for you to understand how the information on the balance sheet works and what it means in order to make informed decisions about improving your money management skills. Let us know if we can help! Contact our team of experts today and let them show you how they have helped others grow their wealth with remarkably simple math.

QuickBooks Beginner Mistakes You Must Avoid

QuickBooks Beginner Mistakes You Must Avoid

If you’re familiar with QuickBooks Online, you know how spectacular it is in maintaining financial records for small and medium businesses. Whether you’re a business owner or an individual looking for reliable bookmaking software, QuickBooks is a great option.

However, there are some common mistakes beginners tend to make in QuickBooks Online. In this post, we are going to look at the most common mistakes in QuickBooks and how to avoid them.

If you’ve already made these mistakes, it’s your time to correct them. And if it’s your first time using QuickBooks, you’re in luck because you rectify can your mistakes without even making them!

 

Forgetting to Update the Records

This is by far the most common mistake QuickBooks users make. If you’re guilty of the same crime, it’s a good thing you’re not alone. With the fast-paced nature of today’s business world and the stress of managing everything, it’s fairly normal to miss a few transactions here and there.

However, these mistakes might become costly if not fixed immediately. When your QuickBooks records don’t match up with your bank statements, it means you are not on top of your organization’s finances.

To avoid such a rookie mistake, build up the habit of recording transactions when they happen. If it’s too much to ask, at least update the records at the end of the day.

 

Double Charge

Believe it or not, double entries are also very common among beginners. If you’re the conscious kind, you are more prone to making this mistake. Let’s look at an example.

Suppose, you went on a business trip at the beginning of the month and you spent from

quickbooks transaction

 your credit cards only due to a short in company accounts. Being a good businessman, you logged everything in your expenses tab as a business trip.

However, at the end of the month, when you are paying the credit card bills, you are also considering the ‘business trip’ from before. So, there are effectively two entries for the same expense.

It can cause you a lot of headaches. So, it’s always better to be careful when making entries. Label them clearly so they don’t create confusion for yourself.

 

Write Checks for Payrolls

If you’ve been using QuickBooks as a business owner, there is a good chance you use it for employee payroll as well. So, how do you pay the payroll taxes? If you’ve been using the Write Checks window, you’ve been doing it wrong!

When you use the Payroll function in QuickBooks, the payroll taxes are automatically filed in the Payroll Liabilities window. When you pay them through the Write Checks, the tracking gets all messed up.

So, only use the Payroll Liabilities to pay off those taxes!

 

Deleting Transactions

It’s another huge mistake made by rookie QuickBooks users. As QuickBooks does the job of central bookkeeping for your business, all of the transactions are interconnected across different accounts.

So, when you delete a transaction from one account, it affects the whole ledger. And at the end of the month when you finally sit down to make sense of things, the deleted transaction will cause you a lot of headaches!

So, if you absolutely have to delete any transactions, look for other entries that it might affect. For example, if you delete a transaction in one account, it will effect another account. So keep this in mind before deleting transactions.

 

Making Too Many Accounts

The sub-accounts feature is quite handy in QuickBooks to further organize the books. However, some users take the concept too far and open up accounts and sub-accounts for each of their expenses. If you can keep track, it’s all good.

The problem arises when you can’t. Introducing too many variables is a surefire way to confuse things. For example, do you really need sub-accounts like electricity, gas, etc. under the bills account?

It brings extra stress on your organizing skills. So, what you can do is chalk out a plan for your accounts before you make them. Make a list of the information that you actually need to know and start accounts from there.

So, delete any unnecessary accounts you may have now to tidy up your QuickBooks account.

Tax Preparation Enablement

We provide your organization a true end to end solution to all of your tax needs. Tax season is year round to Protea – if you aren’t preparing daily, it’s too easy to get behind. We are always working with your organization to streamline your businesses tax management.